Location:Home - Faculty - Professor

Qi Wan, M.D, PH.D
\
Qi Wan, M.D., PH.D.
E-mail Address: qwan@whu.edu.cn
Office Address: Building No.1, DongHu Road 185#, Wuhan, Hubei, 430071
Position(s): Professor
Affiliation(s): Department of Physiology
Research interests / Specialties: Cellular and molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection and neurodegeneration
Education and Training
Medical Degree, 1979-1984 Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China 
M.Sc., 1988-1990 Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China
Ph.D., 1993-1996 Joint program of University of Hong Kong and University of Toronto, Canada 
Post-doctoral training, 1997-2000 University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada 
Research Description
 The excitatory glutamate receptors and the inhibitory GABAA receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that play essential roles in the central nervous system. My research is focused on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the modulations of glutamate and GABAA receptors by intracellular signals in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. My study aims at determining how these mechanisms mediate the regulation of synaptic plasticity under physiological conditions and why dysfunctional regulations of these receptors contribute to neuronal death and/or neurodegeneration in pathological conditions, and thus providing molecular basis for the development of neuroprotective strategies for the treatment of patients suffering from stroke, traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases. To realize these goals, we have been employing multiple approaches (i.e. electrophysiology, molecular biology and protein biochemistry) and various preparations (i.e. cell lines, primary neuronal cultures, brain slice and in vivo brain tissues) to test our hypotheses.
 
Publication list
1. Li H, Chen HZ, Guo S, Li ZZ, Lu Y, Jiang DS, Zhang R, Lei H, Gao L, Zhang X, Zhang Y, Wang L, Zhu LH, Xiang M, Zhou Y, Wan Q, Dong H, and Liu DP. A Critical Role for Interferon Regulatory Factor 9 in Cerebral Ischemic Stroke. Journal of Neuroscience. 2014; 34(36):11897-912. 
2. Liu Y, Wang L, Long ZY, Wu YM, Wan Q, Jiang JX, Wang ZG. Inhibiting PTEN Protects Hippocampal Neurons against Stretch Injury by Decreasing Membrane Translocation of AMPA Receptor GluR2 Subunit. PLoS One. 2013; 17;8(6):e65431. 
3. Zheng M, Liao M, Cui T, Fan DS, and Wan Q: Regulation of nuclear TDP-43 by NR2A-containing NMDA receptor and phosphatase PTEN. J Cell Science 2012; 125:1556-67.
4. Hu R, Duan B, Wang D, Yu Y, Li W, Luo H, Lu P, Lin J, Zhu G, Wan Q and Feng H: Role of acid-sensing ion channel 1a in the secondary damage of traumatic spinal cord injury. Annals of Surgery 2011;254:1–10.
5. Chang N, Li L, Hu R, Shan Y, Liu B, Li L, Wang H, Feng H, Wang D, Cheung CC, Liao M and Wan Q: Differential regulation of NMDA receptor function by DJ-1 and PINK1. Aging Cell . 2010; 9:837–850.
6. Cheung CC, Yang C, Berger T, Zaugg K, Reilly P, Elia AJ, Wakeham A, You-Ten A, Chang N, Li LJ, Wan Q and Mak TW: Identification of BERP (brain-expressed Ring finger protein) as a p53 target gene that modulates seizure susceptibility through interacting with GABA-A receptors. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2010; 107(26):11883-8. 
7. Liu B, Li L, Zhang Q, Chang N, Wang D, Shan Y, Li L, Wang H, Feng H, Zhang L, Brann DW and Wan Q: Preservation of GABAA receptor function by PTEN inhibition protects against neuronal death in ischemic stroke. Stroke 2010; 41(5):1018-26. 
8. Li L, El-Hayek YH, Liu BS, Chen Y, Gomez E, Wu XH, Ning K, Li LJ, Chang C, Zhang L, Wang ZG, Hu X, Wan Q: Direct-current Electrical Field Guides Neural Stem/progenitor Cell Migration. Stem Cells 2008; 26(7): 1610-1836. 
9. Li LJ and Wan Q: rSac3, a new member of Sac domain phosphoinositide phosphatases family. Cell Research 2007; 17:1-3. 
10. Chang N, El-Hayek YH, Gomez E and Wan Q: Phosphatase PTEN in neuronal injury and brain disorders. Trends in Neurosciences 2007; 30(11): 581-586. 
11. Liu B, Liao M, Mielke JG, Li L, Chen Y, Ning K, El-Hayek YH, Zukin RS, Fehlings MG, Wan Q: Ischemic insults direct GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors to synaptic sites. Journal of Neuroscience, 2006; 26(20):5309-19. 
12. Ji SP, Zhang Y, Cleemput JV, Jiang W, Liao M, Li L, Wan Q, Backstrom JR & Zhang X: Disruption of protein-protein coupling between PTEN and serotonin 5-HT2C receptor suppresses marijuana rewarding effects. Nature Medicine 2006; 12(3):324-9. 
13. Ning K, Li L, Liao M, Liu B, Mielke JG, Chen Y, Duan Y, El-Hayek YH, Wan Q: Circadian regulation of GABA(A) receptor function by CKIepsilon-CKIdelta in the rat suprachiasmatic nuclei. Nature Neuroscience. 2004; 7(5):489-490. 
14. Ning K, Pei L, Liao M, Liu B, Zhang Y, Jiang W, Mielke JG, Li L, Chen Y, El-Hayek YH, Fehlings MG, Zhang X, Liu F, Eubanks J, Wan Q: Dual neuroprotective signaling mediated by downregulating two distinct phosphatase activities of PTEN. Journal of Neuroscience. 2004; 24(16):4052-60. 
15. Liu F, Wan Q, Pristupa ZB, Yu XM, Wang YT, Niznik HB: Direct protein-protein coupling enables cross-talk between dopamine D5 and γ-aminobutyric acid A receptors. Nature. 2000; 403:274-280. 
16. Wan Q, Man HY, Liu F, Braunton J, Niznik HB, Pang SF, Brown GM, Wang YT: Differential modulation of GABAA receptor function by MEL1a and MEL1b receptors. Nature Neuroscience. 1999; 2(5): 401-403. 
17. Wan Q, Xiong ZG, Man HY, Ackerley CA, Braunton J, Lu WY, Becker LE, MacDonald JF, Wang YT: Recruitment of functional GABAA receptors to postsynaptic domains by insulin.  Nature. 1997; 388:686-690.